How do I Tap My Trees?

How do I tap my trees? That’s a great question, and today on the blog we’ll show you exactly how to get started.  The first thing you’ll need to do is identify what types of trees you have for tapping. Fall is the perfect time to identify the trees in your yard because the leaves have not completely fallen off of the trees yet. Next, you’ll need to pick up a maple tree tapping kit, available here with free two day shipping.

Step One – Identify Your Trees

Identify the trees in your yard and mark them with a ribbon so that you know which ones you’ll be tapping during the sugaring season. The shape and color of the leaves will help you identify what type of trees you have. See our maple tree identification guide here.

Step Two – Purchase Tree Tapping Supplies

Maple sugaring equipment can be purchased directly from our store on Amazon here. You’ll need a basic maple tapping kit which includes instructions, taps and food grade drop lines. It’s essential to purchase food grade equipment here so that your sap is not contaminated with any chemicals or other unwanted contamination.

Step Three – Tap My Trees

Once the sugaring season rolls around between January and March you can tap your trees! Figure out exactly when to tap your trees by reading our timing guide located here. You’ll need to drill a 5/16” tap hole in each tree, where you’ll insert your plastic tap into. Collect your sap into a food grade container such as a spring water jug with cap. Be sure to check the container twice a day, once in the morning and once in the afternoon.

Still have more questions about sugaring? Check out our FAQ page here full of frequently asked questions about making maple syrup at home.

 

 

Tap My Trees

One of the most rewarding outdoor activities during the spring season is to tap maple trees and get outside with nature! I tap my trees each year in early spring, which here in Connecticut is usually in February. Though unusual, sometimes the sugaring season comes early like it did in 2016 – where I tapped in January.

I love being outside during this time of year; the forest is calm as the sun begins to warm the earth. The smell of crisp spring air fills my lungs as I hike through the woods to collect ice cold maple sap. Snow melts from the daily thaw cycle, and the sound of spring birds singing and water dripping is all you can hear. Wether we’re here or not to observe its rhythm, mother nature carries on.

There is something enchanting about being out there in the sugar bush observing its beauty. To think that Native American tribes collected and processed maple and birch sap hundreds of years before us is amazing. Though the methods and technology have changed, we still collect sap for the same reasons people always have. We enjoy drinking maple sap, using sap to brew coffee, and boiling it down into maple syrup.

The best way to get started making maple syrup is to pick up one of our super affordable maple tree tapping kits. Each kit includes food grade drop lines, 5/16” tree spouts and a quick start guide explaining how to tap a tree. This is the same equipment used by professional sugaring operations all around the country today! Kits can be easily cleaned at the end of the sugaring season and reused year after year. It’s also a great way to teach kids about nature in both a school and at home setting.

So what are you waiting for? Get out there and reconnect with the natural beauty that surrounds us!

Connect with me on Facebook and Instagram to join the discussion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions About Tapping Maple Trees

We hear a lot of questions about how to tap trees, collect maple sap and make maple syrup. Today we will talk about some of the most frequently asked questions we see and answer them below. If you have a question you’d like us to answer, ask us in the comments below or connect with us over on Facebook!

What is the smallest tree I can tap?

The smallest tree you would want to tap would have a diameter of 10” or ten inches. Trees smaller than that should not be tapped.

Can I install more than one tap or spout in my maple tree?

Trees with a diameter of 10”to 17” can support one tap. Trees with a diameter of at least 18” can support two taps.

How much sap will I get from each maple tree?

Each tree should produce around ten to twenty gallons of sap each season. This varies depending upon the maple season and the health of the individual tree. For example, two identical trees located right next to each other can produce very different levels of sap.

How deep should I drill into the tree?

Drill into the tree approximately 1.5” past the bark and into the white wood. Total depth is approximately 2.5”.

Does maple tapping hurt or damage the tree?

Tapping does not hurt or damage the tree. Following proper care when tapping will avoid any damage to the tree. Only drill one tap hole with one spout for small trees to reduce stress on the tree. The maple is the only species that is self-healing, and the tap hole will heal and close up during the year.

When I’m done collecting sap, should I put anything into the tap hole to stop the flow of sap?

No. The maple tree will heal and close up the tap hole on its own. Never put any foreign objects or plugs into the maple tree.

What is in maple sap?

Maple sap is a complex natural blend of water, sugar, minerals, vitamins and antioxidants.

Is it safe to drink sap straight from the tree?

Generally speaking, sap is sterile before it leaves the maple tree. However, bacteria can enter the sap once it leaves the tree and is exposed to the environment or your collection container. It is similar to consuming raw cow’s milk; there are both risks and benefits to consuming raw vs. pasteurized beverages. To be safe, boil your maple sap first before drinking it.

How much sap does it take to make a gallon of finished maple syrup?

Sugar maples have the highest concentration of sugar in their sap, so they work best for making syrup. It takes about 40 gallons of sap boiled down to make one gallon of finished syrup.

Where can I buy a maple tree tapping kit and supplies?

Buy a complete tree tapping kit complete with guide sheet and instructions here on Amazon.

How do I tap a maple tree?

Watch our video guide on how to make maple syrup here!

How do I identify what kind of maple trees I have?

See our complete guide on identifying maple trees here.

 

How to Make Maple Syrup

Learn how to tap your maple tree, collect the sap and boil it down into syrup! We just tapped our trees a few days ago here in Connecticut, and have already collected several gallons of fresh, nutrient-rich organic maple sap. We boiled down the sap with a propane gas burner until the sap reached a wonderful golden amber color and stored it in a sterilized mason jar.

This buttery, light amber syrup pictured above is characteristic of the syrup produced very early in the sugaring season. As the season progresses, the syrup produced will become slightly darker in a medium amber color, eventually getting very dark and robust in flavor as we near the end of the season.

Get your maple tree tapping kit here on Amazon. Need some more help? Chat with us here on Instagram.

12 Amazing Facts About Maple Syrup

1. It takes about 40 gallons of sap to make just one gallon of maple syrup.

2. In early spring, sap flow is caused by a daily fluctuation in temperature. Below freezing temps at night and warming above 32 degrees during the day causes sap to flow.

3. Maple syrup is a 100% natural product with nothing else added.

4. Scientists from the University of Rhode Island have identified 54 beneficial natural compounds in pure maple syrup.

5. In 2012, thieves stole $20 million dollars worth of syrup from reserves in Montreal, Canada.

6. In Japan, people eat fried maple leaves as a delicacy.

7. Canada produces over 80% of the world’s total maple syrup supply.

8. There are several grades and colors of maple syrup, and each has different flavors and nuances. Syrup produced early in the season is light amber with light flavor, and gradually darkens in color and strengthens in flavor as the sugaring season progresses.

9. The maple tree is the only tree that is self healing.

10. Maple water is the new coconut water! Maple sap is now commercially sold as a beverage.

11. Drinking sap from the maple tree known as Gorosoe has long been a spring tradition in South Korea.

12. Sap is enjoyed at heated public bath houses across South Korea each spring. They believe in sweating out toxins from the body and rejuvenating the body with healthy minerals and nutrients from maple sap.

Make your own maple syrup at home with a tree tapping kit!